Munford Fire Station

New Facility Serves as Emergency Response,
Community Hub, and Museum

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A2H partnered with the City of Munford to design the community’s new, state-of-the-art fire protection facility. The station, previously contained in a building totaling less than 2,000 square feet, provides fire protection, rescue, and EMS services for Munford and surrounding South Tipton County, with a total usage population of more than 60,000.

Context Sensitivity

Because of the station’s close proximity to City Hall, our architects designed the new fire station to be context sensitive — both to the surrounding area and adjacent buildings. 

The building features classic red brick and a pitched roof, to complement the classic style of City Hall, which is right next door. To further synergy between the two buildings, the team designed a shared plaza for pedestrian and fire truck use only.


The City of Munford and A2H approached building design with three key objectives in mind: Functionality, Sustainability, and Engagement. 

Functionality
Positioned in the civic hub of the Munford-Atoka-Brighton, the City’s new fire station serves much more than just public needs — it’s a recognizable community symbol. The space features three oversized apparatus bays with additional space for equipment, sleeping quarters, a kitchen that Chief Alan Barkelew says has “all of the amenties,” a fitness center, and business offices and conference rooms for continuing education, staffing, and meetings.

Sustainability

We have designed a number of facilities across the state and one thing is clear:  it means little if a building is beautiful but it does not work. The Munford Fire Station was designed to be beautiful, economically and environmentally sustainable, and respectful of budgetary constraints. As such, architects designed the facility to incorporate a number of the US Green Building Council’s sustainable elements and best practices, but stopped just short of pursuing LEED certification to reduce project cost.

Engagement

As a public amenity and gathering space, architects designed the station’s lobby — which doubles as a fire museum —as a nod to the station’s decades of services to the community and to serve as a learning opportunity for students at nearby schools.

 
 
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